Schedule

Schedule

Monday, December 22

1419292800 Tech News 2Night

Tuesday, December 23

1419357600 Tech News Today
1419361200 MacBreak Weekly
1419368400 Security Now
1419375600 Before You Buy
1419379200 Tech News 2Night
1419382800 All About Android
1419391800 Padre's Corner

Wednesday, December 24

1419444000 Tech News Today
1419447600 Windows Weekly
1419454800 This Week in Google
1419465600 Tech News 2Night

Thursday, December 25

1419530400 Tech News Today
1419534000 Know How...
1419537600 Marketing Mavericks
1419543000 Coding 101
1419546600 Home Theater Geeks
1419553800 The Giz Wiz

Friday, December 26

1419616800 Tech News Today
1419638400 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, December 27

1419706800 The Tech Guy

Sunday, December 28

1419793200 The Tech Guy
1419807600 This Week in Tech

Monday, December 29

1419876000 Tech News Today
1419879600 Triangulation
1419885000 iPad Today
1419897600 Tech News 2Night

Tuesday, December 30

1419962400 Tech News Today
1419966000 MacBreak Weekly
1419973200 Security Now
1419980400 Before You Buy
1419984000 Tech News 2Night
1419987600 All About Android
1419996600 Padre's Corner

Wednesday, December 31

1420043400 FLOSS Weekly
1420048800 Tech News Today
1420052400 Windows Weekly
1420059600 This Week in Google
1420070400 Tech News 2Night
1420072200 Android App Arena
1420077600 Ham Nation

Thursday, January 1

1420135200 Tech News Today
1420138800 Know How...
1420142400 Marketing Mavericks
1420147800 Coding 101

Most Recent Episodes

Triangulation
Episode #181: The Best of 2014 December 22nd, 2014

A collection of some of the best interview moments of 2014.

Tech News Today

We talk about women in technology with Elise Hu, Selena Larson, and Sarah Frier.

This Week in Tech

Cyber vandalism, the 'Year in Search,' Yahoo story time, and more.

The Tech Guy
The Tech Guy 1146 December 21st, 2014

iMac Fusion drive vs SSD.

The Tech Guy
The Tech Guy 1145 December 20th, 2014

Is North Korea responsible for the Sony hack?

Tech News 2Night

BBC says Apple mistreats factory workers.

This Week in Law

Photojournalist claims a blog infringes his copyright of the monkey selfie.

Tech News Today

The BBC has aired a new documentary slamming Apple

This Week in Computer Hardware

AMD Omega Driver, mechanical keys, and Broadwell NUC pics.

The Giz Wiz
Episode #1498: Inflate My Ego December 18th, 2014

TalkBand, disco lights, inflatable chair, and more!

Know How... 78

FreeNAS

January 30 2014

Got a few old computers lying around? Want an enterprise-level storage box? Expert guest Patrick Norton shows us how to create a FreeNAS using old system parts.

Feedback!

Thanks for our listeners who participate in the KH Community!

Featured Users

Mike Marien wanted to know if we should use the same SSID on multiple APs.

Warren Blesofsky was wondering if "Windows Defender" is the only malware defense he should run on his Windows PC.

Vivek Dhutia has a great "Solar Pi" server that he NEEDS to send a picture of.

Neil Tsubota asked about the practical reasons for using static IP addresses.

Lee Roche is thinking about making an advanced test bench.

** If you plan to reuse an old ATX Power Supply, connect pins 14 & 15.

RAID

Here's a bunch of RAID stuff from Wikipedia.

RAID 0 comprises striping (but no parity or mirroring). This level provides no data redundancy nor fault tolerance, but improves performance through parallelism of read and write operations across multiple drives. RAID 0 has no error detection mechanism, so the failure of one disk causes the loss of all data on the array.

RAID 1 comprises mirroring (without parity or striping). Data are written identically to two (or more) drives, thereby producing a "mirrored set". The read request is serviced by any of the drives containing the requested data. This can improve performance if data is read from the disk with the least seek latency and rotational latency. Conversely, write performance can be degraded because all drives must be updated; thus the write performance is determined by the slowest drive. The array continues to operate as long as at least one drive is functioning.

RAID 2 comprises bit-level striping with dedicated Hamming-code parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential bit is on a different drive. Hamming-code parity is calculated across corresponding bits and stored on at least one parity drive. This level is of historical significance only. Although it was used on some early machines (e.g. the Thinking Machines CM-2), it is not used by any current commercially available systems.

RAID 3 comprises byte-level striping with dedicated parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential byte is on a different drive. Parity is calculated across corresponding bytes and stored on a dedicated parity drive. Although implementations exist, RAID 3 is not commonly used in practice.

RAID 4 comprises block-level striping with dedicated parity.

RAID 5 comprises block-level striping with distributed parity. Unlike in RAID 4, parity information is distributed among the drives. It requires that all drives but one be present to operate. Upon failure of a single drive, subsequent reads can be calculated from the distributed parity such that no data is lost. RAID 5 requires at least three disks.

RAID 6 comprises block-level striping with double distributed parity. Double parity provides fault tolerance up to two failed drives. This makes larger RAID groups more practical, especially for high-availability systems, as large-capacity drives take longer to restore. As with RAID 5, a single drive failure results in reduced performance of the entire array until the failed drive has been replaced.

FreeNAS

Network Attached Storage products have become more commonplace as users demand access to their data on all their network-connected devices. FreeNAS is a FreeBSD-based operating system that installs in 2GB of space and can turn your old hardware into an enterprise-level storage box.

What you'll need

  • Computer: You want the fastest processor you can salvage, a motherboard that supports AT LEAST 4GB of memory and has multiple SATA ports, a case with many drive bays, and a 300W and Power Supply.
  • DRIVES!: You can use any drives you've got running around while you're learning FreeNAS, but when you decide to build a FreeNAS box that will serve as your permanent storage you should consider using either the WD GREEN or WD RED series of drives. They run cooler, quieter and use less power.
  • PCI SATA card (Optional)
  • Flash Drive: 4GB
  • Monitor + Keyboard
  • Blank CD
  • USB CD-ROM drive
  • A second network-connected computer that can be used to configure the FreeNAS box

What you'll do

  1. Download the latest FreeNAS disto and burn it to CD-ROM
  2. Open the computer and strip out the hard drives and optical drives. You want to save all the drive bays and SATA ports for the array drives.
  3. Plug the Flash drive into a USB port
  4. Connect all your drives to the motherboard. You MAY need additional SATA power breakout cables. You may also need a PCI SATA board if you want to install more drives in the case than the motherboard supports.
  5. Connect the monitor and keyboard to the computer, the connect the computer to your network.
  6. Power up the PC: Load the CD into your USB optical drive and make sure it's set to boot from that optical drive
  7. Install FreeNAS on the USB Key
  8. Log into the FreeNAS box. (The IP address will show up on the screen connected to the FreeNAS box.)

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