Schedule

Schedule

Thursday, October 23

1414083600 Tech News Today
1414087200 Know How...
1414090800 Marketing Mavericks
1414096200 Coding 101
1414099800 Home Theater Geeks
1414105200 Tech News 2Night
1414107000 The Giz Wiz

Friday, October 24

1414170000 Tech News Today
1414173600 This Week in Law
1414180800 Android App Arena
1414191600 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, October 25

1414260000 The Tech Guy

Sunday, October 26

1414346400 The Tech Guy
1414360800 This Week in Tech

Monday, October 27

1414429200 Tech News Today
1414432800 Triangulation
1414438200 iPad Today
1414450800 Tech News 2Night

Tuesday, October 28

1414515600 Tech News Today
1414519200 MacBreak Weekly
1414526400 Security Now
1414533600 Before You Buy
1414537200 Tech News 2Night
1414540800 All About Android
1414549800 Padre's Corner

Wednesday, October 29

1414596600 FLOSS Weekly
1414602000 Tech News Today
1414605600 Windows Weekly
1414612800 This Week in Google
1414623600 Tech News 2Night
1414630800 Ham Nation

Thursday, October 30

1414688400 Tech News Today
1414692000 Know How...
1414695600 Marketing Mavericks
1414701000 Coding 101
1414704600 Home Theater Geeks
1414710000 Tech News 2Night
1414711800 The Giz Wiz

Friday, October 31

1414774800 Tech News Today
1414778400 This Week in Law
1414785600 Android App Arena
1414796400 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, November 1

1414864800 The Tech Guy

Most Recent Episodes

Ham Nation

Gordon West explains why use a dipole.

This Week in Google
Episode #272: Check Your Inbox October 22nd, 2014

Google looks to reinvent email with Inbox.

iFive for the iPhone

Vine updates, landscape mode app folder tricks

Tech News 2Night

Homeboy security cam, Microsoft's app Garage

Windows Weekly
Episode #385: President Spacey October 22nd, 2014

Updates for the Xbox One and Windows Technical Preview.

FLOSS Weekly
Episode #313: FenixEDU October 22nd, 2014

FenixEDU is a platform to manage data for education.

Tech News Today

Tim Cook visits with Chinese official after claims that China is harvesting iCloud logins.

Padre's Corner
Episode #11: Pandora's Promise October 21st, 2014

Documentary filmmaker Robert Stone, Nuclear Power, and

All About Android

A deep dive into all of Google's latest announcements around Lollipop and the new Nexus family.

Before You Buy

Leo Laporte reviews the Galaxy Note 4.

Know How... 78

FreeNAS

January 30 2014

Got a few old computers lying around? Want an enterprise-level storage box? Expert guest Patrick Norton shows us how to create a FreeNAS using old system parts.

Feedback!

Thanks for our listeners who participate in the KH Community!

Featured Users

Mike Marien wanted to know if we should use the same SSID on multiple APs.

Warren Blesofsky was wondering if "Windows Defender" is the only malware defense he should run on his Windows PC.

Vivek Dhutia has a great "Solar Pi" server that he NEEDS to send a picture of.

Neil Tsubota asked about the practical reasons for using static IP addresses.

Lee Roche is thinking about making an advanced test bench.

** If you plan to reuse an old ATX Power Supply, connect pins 14 & 15.

RAID

Here's a bunch of RAID stuff from Wikipedia.

RAID 0 comprises striping (but no parity or mirroring). This level provides no data redundancy nor fault tolerance, but improves performance through parallelism of read and write operations across multiple drives. RAID 0 has no error detection mechanism, so the failure of one disk causes the loss of all data on the array.

RAID 1 comprises mirroring (without parity or striping). Data are written identically to two (or more) drives, thereby producing a "mirrored set". The read request is serviced by any of the drives containing the requested data. This can improve performance if data is read from the disk with the least seek latency and rotational latency. Conversely, write performance can be degraded because all drives must be updated; thus the write performance is determined by the slowest drive. The array continues to operate as long as at least one drive is functioning.

RAID 2 comprises bit-level striping with dedicated Hamming-code parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential bit is on a different drive. Hamming-code parity is calculated across corresponding bits and stored on at least one parity drive. This level is of historical significance only. Although it was used on some early machines (e.g. the Thinking Machines CM-2), it is not used by any current commercially available systems.

RAID 3 comprises byte-level striping with dedicated parity. All disk spindle rotation is synchronized and data is striped such that each sequential byte is on a different drive. Parity is calculated across corresponding bytes and stored on a dedicated parity drive. Although implementations exist, RAID 3 is not commonly used in practice.

RAID 4 comprises block-level striping with dedicated parity.

RAID 5 comprises block-level striping with distributed parity. Unlike in RAID 4, parity information is distributed among the drives. It requires that all drives but one be present to operate. Upon failure of a single drive, subsequent reads can be calculated from the distributed parity such that no data is lost. RAID 5 requires at least three disks.

RAID 6 comprises block-level striping with double distributed parity. Double parity provides fault tolerance up to two failed drives. This makes larger RAID groups more practical, especially for high-availability systems, as large-capacity drives take longer to restore. As with RAID 5, a single drive failure results in reduced performance of the entire array until the failed drive has been replaced.

FreeNAS

Network Attached Storage products have become more commonplace as users demand access to their data on all their network-connected devices. FreeNAS is a FreeBSD-based operating system that installs in 2GB of space and can turn your old hardware into an enterprise-level storage box.

What you'll need

  • Computer: You want the fastest processor you can salvage, a motherboard that supports AT LEAST 4GB of memory and has multiple SATA ports, a case with many drive bays, and a 300W and Power Supply.
  • DRIVES!: You can use any drives you've got running around while you're learning FreeNAS, but when you decide to build a FreeNAS box that will serve as your permanent storage you should consider using either the WD GREEN or WD RED series of drives. They run cooler, quieter and use less power.
  • PCI SATA card (Optional)
  • Flash Drive: 4GB
  • Monitor + Keyboard
  • Blank CD
  • USB CD-ROM drive
  • A second network-connected computer that can be used to configure the FreeNAS box

What you'll do

  1. Download the latest FreeNAS disto and burn it to CD-ROM
  2. Open the computer and strip out the hard drives and optical drives. You want to save all the drive bays and SATA ports for the array drives.
  3. Plug the Flash drive into a USB port
  4. Connect all your drives to the motherboard. You MAY need additional SATA power breakout cables. You may also need a PCI SATA board if you want to install more drives in the case than the motherboard supports.
  5. Connect the monitor and keyboard to the computer, the connect the computer to your network.
  6. Power up the PC: Load the CD into your USB optical drive and make sure it's set to boot from that optical drive
  7. Install FreeNAS on the USB Key
  8. Log into the FreeNAS box. (The IP address will show up on the screen connected to the FreeNAS box.)

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