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Most Recent Episodes

Ham Nation

Bob Heil visits the ultimate builder.

iFive for the iPhone

Is the Apple Watch vulnerable to theft?

This Week in Google

Google Tracker (I/O edition), Android M, Chromecast 2, and lots more.

Android App Arena

GTasks, Wunderlist, Any.do, Layout.

Windows Weekly

Cortana on iOS and Android, and Salesforce turns down $55 billion from MS.

Tech News 2Night

NPR's Elise Hu joins us to talk about Japan's Start-up scene.

FLOSS Weekly
Episode #338: Lucee May 27th, 2015

Andrew Dixon, Gert Franz, and Lucee: a dynamic scripting language for the JVM.

Tech News Today

iPhones crash and reboot when a specific string of text is received.

All About Android

Google IO predictions, Periscope for Android, and a a packed round table session.

Security Now
Episode #509: TLS Logjam May 26th, 2015

Routers with a USB port could be vulnerable to attack because of a NetUSB bug.

Know How... 57

Turn Your Android into a Spy Cam

August 22 2013

Today, we're going to do a viewer request episode. Lots of you wrote in asking how to make your old phone into a surveillance camera.

Know-It-Alls

First up, we asked our audience, the "Know-It-Alls," what apps they used to make a surveillance camera. (You can see our questions if you follow either @iyaz or @snubs on Twitter.)

Ever turn your Android phone into a surveillance cam? What app did you use? #TWiTKH

Michael Tonge @MikeTonge
@iyaz Ustream. It means if someone steals the phone, I still have the evidence on the ustream site. #TWiTKH

Alex Ho @Imalexho
@iyaz ip webcam and tiny cam monitor

Setting up your Android as a webcam

We used IP Webcam, a very powerful Android app (that's free, too!) that turns our phone or tablet into a camera accessible on our home network. When you start up the app, you'll get a preference page where you can set your resolution of your video and photos, set image orientation, create a login and password, and more.

Scrolling all the way to the bottom of the page shows you the "Start server" option. When you start your server, you'll see your camera's output. On the bottom of the screen will be your internal IP address. The application itself is very helpful.

Watching your camera

To watch your camera, you just have to type in that internal IP address along with the port in a web browser. On your browser, you'll be greeted with plenty of options on how to watch your video. Try out "Use javascript to update frames in browser" to see your video.

If you'd like to view your camera on another Android device, you can use a web browser or use tinyCam Monitor FREE for Android. As the name suggests, the app is free and lets you view cameras. To add your camera, select "Manage Cameras, then add one by clicking the "+" button. Put in the information that corresponds to your camera in tinyCam Monitor Free. If you'd like to record the output, you'll have to pony up for the pay version.

Accessing your camera outside your network

To access your camera outside of your home network, you'll have to do a couple of extra steps. You'll need to know your home IP address. You can find that by simply typing into Google "What's my IP address."

You'll also need to set up port forwarding on your home router. Routers vary greatly by company, so we suggest checking out PortForward.com to find where on your router port forwarding is.

For our home router (an Asus brand router), we had to create a virtual server. We named the service something recognizable ("IP Webcam"), picked 80 as our port range, then input the local IP address of our Android device at home. Then we inputted the local port and selected TCP as the protocol. After adding that server, hit apply.

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