Schedule

Schedule

Friday, April 18

1397840400 Tech News Today
1397844000 This Week in Law
1397862000 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, April 19

1397930400 The Tech Guy

Sunday, April 20

1398016800 The Tech Guy
1398031200 This Week in Tech

Monday, April 21

1398099600 Tech News Today
1398103200 Triangulation
1398108600 iPad Today
1398121200 Tech News 2Night

Tuesday, April 22

1398180600 Marketing Mavericks
1398186000 Tech News Today
1398189600 MacBreak Weekly
1398196800 Security Now
1398204000 Before You Buy
1398207600 Tech News 2Night
1398211200 All About Android

Wednesday, April 23

1398267000 FLOSS Weekly
1398272400 Tech News Today
1398276000 Windows Weekly
1398283200 This Week in Google
1398294000 Tech News 2Night
1398295800 The Giz Wiz
1398301200 Ham Nation

Thursday, April 24

1398358800 Tech News Today
1398362400 Know How...
1398366000 The Social Hour
1398371400 Coding 101
1398375000 Home Theater Geeks
1398380400 Tech News 2Night
1398384000 OMGcraft

Friday, April 25

1398445200 Tech News Today
1398448800 This Week in Law
1398466800 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, April 26

1398535200 The Tech Guy

Sunday, April 27

1398621600 The Tech Guy
1398636000 This Week in Tech

Most Recent Episodes

Home Theater Geeks

POV binaural audio recording with High-Definition video.

Tech News 2Night

Dropbox is on an acquisition spree, Facebook lets you find your Friends on a map, try-on Google Glass at home, Twitter's ad app launches, Amazon's Fire TV expands voice search, iOS could have Shazam built-in, and Honda's ASIMO robot is even more human.

Know How...

The Heartbleed exploit explained with jellybeans, tweak Windows 7 or 8 for extra speed, manage your passwords with LastPass, and a first look at the WRT 1900AC.

Coding 101

Your Python list example, we'll explain the Heartbleed bug with jelly beans, and a While Loop.

The Social Hour

Amber & Sarah chat with Stageit's Evan Lowenstein on connecting artists and fans, Twitter's new ad strategy, US Airways' major major tweet fail, is Runkeeper's Breeze app Rad or Fad? And more!

OMGcraft

Chad shows off Play Mindcrack's version of Goat Simulator for Minecraft!

Tech News Today

Aereo creates a website to convince the world that it rents antennas and doesn't steal content, Eyefi is launching a cloud service that automatically backs up all your pictures from all your cameras, and more.

Ham Nation

Bob's NAB experience, DX Code of Conduct, Arduino ID Timer, and more!

The Giz Wiz

A Bluetooth toothbrush, 360 degree camera, internet music system, Chad gets a Beer Belly, and more.

This Week in Google

A reporter assaulted for wearing Glass, Android's new Camera app, new privacy terms of service and more!

Know How... 31

Make a Raspberry Pi Media Center with XBMC

February 14 2013

Turn your Raspberry Pi into a $35 Media Center with XBMC!

Why XBMC?

We asked you guys what you would do if you had a Raspberry Pi and overwhelmingly, you wanted to make a media center. We did it and found some things out.

If you're unfamiliar with the Raspberry Pi, it's a $35 computer with a 700MHz processor, 2 USB ports, Ethernet, HDMI, analog video and audio out. You power it with a USB adapter. It's a pretty powerful machine at a low cost and it sips electricity.

We loaded RaspBMC on to our Raspberry Pi. It is a specially made version of XBMC. XBMC is a free media center piece of software that is available for all platforms. It originated on the Xbox (formerly known as "Xbox Media Center") and made its way to the PC. RaspBMC is a tiny version of XBMC that is made specially for the hardware on the Raspberry Pi.

Loading RaspBMC

You have to load RaspBMC onto an SD card. We suggest an 8GB Class 10 card. That SD card is used by the Raspberry Pi as its hard drive because the device does not have any onboard storage. You can use a command line or go with the easier GUI solutions. The official Windows installer is made by the RaspBMC guys. There's also a Mac installer called XPi.

RaspBMC on your Pi

Once you get your XBMC installer on the card, plug in your SD card to your Raspberry Pi. Then attach all the other cables (network, HDMI, USB devices and power). We highly suggest using a powered USB hub to support your wireless keyboard or mouse.

Once you power it up, the installation process will continue on the SD card. It ought to take about 30 minutes to download and update all the components.

Performance

The Raspberry Pi handles a lot of things well. Web streaming video, Airplay (audio better than video), local video file playback were all very good.

We did have issues with playing videos from a network resource. It wasn't an issue every time, but we found a workaround. If you have another PC, use it as a server and run a transcoder like PS3 Media Server or TVersity. PS3 Media Server is free and runs on Windows, Mac and Linux. TVersity costs $4 and runs on Windows Only.

Overall, the Raspberry Pi worked very well as a Media Center with XBMC. Responsiveness could be a little slow from time to time, but it's easy to forgive since the device is only $35.

Google+ Spotlight

We've got a great active community where you can discuss ideas with other folks over at Google Plus. Give it a look and get involved!

Reith Walls with a tip on Media Monkey
- you guys missed a MAJOR feature of Media Monkey. Once you have everything tagged, you can right click your ENTIRE library, tell it to auto-rename and organize the files, and Media Monkey will actually re-name all of your music based on the proper tags, and then organize them into Artist and Album folders. Not only does it get everything tagged, but it gets everything organized too.

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People: Leo Laporte