Schedule

Schedule

Wednesday, July 30

1406768400 Ham Nation

Thursday, July 31

1406826000 Tech News Today
1406829600 Know How...
1406833200 The Social Hour
1406838600 Coding 101
1406842200 Home Theater Geeks
1406847600 Tech News 2Night
1406849400 The Giz Wiz
1406858400 OMGcraft

Friday, August 1

1406912400 Tech News Today
1406916000 This Week in Law
1406923200 Android App Arena
1406934000 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, August 2

1407002400 The Tech Guy

Sunday, August 3

1407088800 The Tech Guy
1407103200 This Week in Tech

Monday, August 4

1407171600 Tech News Today
1407175200 Triangulation
1407180600 iPad Today
1407193200 Tech News 2Night
1407195000 Marketing Mavericks

Tuesday, August 5

1407258000 Tech News Today
1407261600 MacBreak Weekly
1407268800 Security Now
1407276000 Before You Buy
1407279600 Tech News 2Night
1407283200 All About Android

Wednesday, August 6

1407339000 FLOSS Weekly
1407344400 Tech News Today
1407348000 Windows Weekly
1407355200 This Week in Google
1407366000 Tech News 2Night
1407367800 redditUP
1407373200 Ham Nation

Thursday, August 7

1407430800 Tech News Today
1407434400 Know How...
1407438000 The Social Hour
1407443400 Coding 101
1407447000 Home Theater Geeks
1407452400 Tech News 2Night
1407454200 The Giz Wiz
1407463200 OMGcraft

Friday, August 8

1407517200 Tech News Today
1407520800 This Week in Law
1407528000 Android App Arena
1407538800 Tech News 2Night

Saturday, August 9

1407607200 The Tech Guy

Most Recent Episodes

iFive for the iPhone

Mailbox email duh tip, Gmail app Drive support, and more.

Windows Weekly

Windows Phone 8.1 update 1

FLOSS Weekly
Episode #303: Bitcore July 30th, 2014

Bitcoin is a new peer-to-peer platform for the next generation of financial technology

Tech News Today

Facebook is throwing a little bit of everything at the wall to see what sticks.

Before You Buy

Amazon Fire Phone reviewed.

All About Android

Is Tizen a nonstarter?

Tech News 2Night

China investigates Microsoft.

Security Now

iOS v7 Jailbroken, iOS Backdoors, and Android Certificate Checking

OMGcraft

Command blocks in Minecraft.

MacBreak Weekly

A closer look at OS X Yosemite.

Know How... 102

Intro to Linux, RC Suspension, & ARP Cache Poisoning Attack

July 17 2014

We talk about the new Raspberry Pi B+, expert guest Aaron Newcomb goes over the different flavors of linux, learn how a remote control car suspension works, and put your black hat on for ARP Cache Poisoning Attack.

News Topic
Raspberry Pi B+ Announced

Linux 101

Aaron Newcomb shows the different flavors of Linux.

Remote Control Car Suspension

Coil Overs and Ball Bearings explained

The ARP Cache Poisoning Attack

The ARP Cache Poisoning Attack
ARP = "Address Resolution Protocol"
MAC = "Media Access Control"

Most of us think that our computers are identified by their IP address.
- However, on an ethernet network, they're actually identified by their MAC address (Media Access Control)
- A MAC is a 6-byte Hexideximal string that looks like, "00:11:aa:bb:cc:dd"

When we connect a computer to a network, it needs to become aware of all the other devices on the network, and all the other devices on the network need to become aware of the device.
- That's what ARP does: It correlates an IP address to a MAC address so that we can find a computer on the network with a particular IP address

Here's how it works:
* Computer A needs to send a file to Computer B
* Computer A knows that Computer B has the IP address of 192.168.1.2
* Computer A does an ARP Broadcast saying, "Hey! Who has the IP address 192.168.1.2?"
* Computer B hears the broadcast and responds, "I Do! 00:00:00:aa:aa:aa"
* Computer A know knows how to send the file to Computer B

Here's how access to the Internet Works:
* Computer A connects to the Network and receives a DHCP address of 192.168.1.3 with a gateway of 192.168.1.1
* It wants to sent data through the gateway to the Internet, so it does an ARP Broadcast saying, "Hey! Which of you is the gateway at 192.168.1.1?"
* The router(gateway) responds, "I'm 192.168.1.1 aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff
* Computer A sends data through the gateway at aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff

** Important to note is that all the devices will CACHE that response: so they all know which IPs belong to which MAC addresses.

Here's how a CACHE Poisoning Attack Works:
* Computer A wants to send data to the Internet, so it does an ARP Broadcast saying, "Hey! Which of you is the gateway at 192.168.1.1?"
* The router responds, "I'm 192.168.1.1 aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff"
* The attacking computer takes note that the gateway is at aa:bb:cc:dd:ee
* The attacking computer responds CONTINUOUSLY "I'm 192.168.1.1 22:22:22:22:22:22"
* Computer A sends data through WHAT IT THINKS is the gateway at 22:22:22:22:22:22
* The attacking computer receives the data, sniffs it, then sends it on to the REAL gateway at aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff

Using Cain and Abel
1. Download and Install Cain and Abel
2. You may need to disable global taskoffloading (netsh int ip set global taskoffload=disable)
3. Run the Sniffer
4. Switch to the Sniffer tab and hit the "+" icon to add a range scan (Use the IP range you're a part of)
5. Switch to the "ARP" tab at the bottom of the screen
6. Hit the "+" icon to Select your router and the client that you want to poison (or multiple clients)
7. Hit the "ARP" icon in the top bar to start the attack
8. Run Wireshark for more clear information

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