Brian Chee

Brian J.S. Chee lives in Kaneohe, Hawaii with his family tracing back to the Kingdom of Hawaii.

With a mechanical engineer father and a biologist mother, he of course avoided the "wet sciences" and went for a degree in Computer Science. One of the first ten Certified Netware Instructors in the world, he was directly involved with building some of the early Netware courseware. With a background in teaching Physics and Computer Science, Brian became the primary Netware instructor in Hawaii in addition to working as inside sales for PC distribution, and outside sales for products like X.25/SNA/SDLC/HDLC and other data communications test equipment. He served on the Coalition for Competitive Communications which achieved destruction of the Hawaiian Telephone monopoly a full year before the federal deregulation of the intraLATA communications market nationwide.

Other jobs included a stop with Xerox as an interfacing specialist, a support manager for a Netware Value Added Reseller and eventually a stint as Senior Computer Scientist for the General Services Administration-Office of Information Security where he designed, built, and supported secure data/video/voice communications systems around the globe.

Currently serving as a communications researcher at the University of Hawaii School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), Brian is also providing consulting services to other research groups throughout the University of Hawaii system. He is starting off on an adventure as the "Evangelist" for ThinLinX Corporation out of Brisbane Australia, makers of Thin Clients for the Microsoft RemoteFX and Citrix HDX environments. Notably, he owns the front panel of the Imsai 8080 that Gordon Eubanks used to write C Basic under the polar icecap (first compiled language for microcomputers), has a length of wire a nanosecond long from Commander Grace Hopper, and has Dr. AlohaNET (Norman Abramson) on his PhD committee (if he even gets moving on the silly thing again).

Not bad for a kid that had trouble staying in school and whose mother thought he had neurological problems, when in actuality the doctors just pronounced him "bored."